B2STREAMLINES

A SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR AVIATION MODELERS


Try these links if you have an interest in tailless and/or unconventional aircraft:

Alula - a SAL RC-HLG from Richter R/C
We've had more fun with our Richter R/C Alula than man was meant to have with a $45 investment. After flying our original Alula with full span elevons for some time, we got the idea of separating the control surfaces into outboard ailerons and inboard elevator halves. While this modification mandates installation of a third servo, overall weight can still be kept down to well below five ounces, and the Alula turns into a real thermal soarer. The Alula2 PDF is about 2.3 MB in size and is a compilation of our three part series published in RC Soaring Digest magazine.

Aircraft Aerodynamics and Design Group, Stanford University
A complex website which includes reports on the development of the high performance SWIFT tailless rigid-wing hang glider and highly nonplanar lifting systems, among a multitude of others, and a complete paper, Design and Analysis of Optimally-loaded Lifting Systems.

Andy MacDonald's Flying Wing Pages
Andy's pages have been up for some time, and additional information is always being added. This is the premier site for information regarding the models of Hans-Jurgen Unverferth, from CO2 through CO8. There are pages devoted to vacuum bagging and construction tips, and there's also a page filled with pictures of various tailless creations from around the world. Certainly worth a visit!

BW 05 02 09
We've used Barnaby Wainfan's BW 05 02 09 airfoil on several projects now, always with great success. This section has a positive pitching moment and is designed for "plank" planforms. We've recently increased the number of points and smoothed the contour using section printouts of 100 inch length. Andre Martins put the new coordinates through XFoil, smoothing the contour by means of the pressure distribution, and increasing the number of coordinate points to 200. The coordinate table for this smoothed section is available as a text download, and the five relevant pressure distribution plots are available as a PDF document.

Culver twist distribution
A mathematical method of determing wing twist for swept wings. The resulting twist distribution creates an elliptical lift distribution across the span. This link includes an explanation of the formula and a spreadsheet template (Excel and Appleworks) written by Aaron Coffey.

Effective Dihedral
One of the most frequently asked questions we receive concerns effective dihedral and its relation to sweep angle. In response, we wrote a multi-part article for RC Soaring Digest which includes how dihedral contributes to stability, how to compute effective dihedral based on geometric dihedral, wing sweep, and other parameters, plus a couple of examples. This PDF document incorporates the entire four part series as published in RCSD. It is 159K in size and can be duplex printed. Feedback is very much appreciated.

EH airfoils
Coordinates and basic aerodynamic data for the EH series of airfoils are on this web site. The EH airfoils were developed by John Yost for swept wing tailless aircraft. With near zero pitching moments and excellent stall characteristics, the EH airfoils are highly recommended for "flying wing" applications. Polars for the EH sections, as well as the Eppler E182, E184, and E186, and the Selig S5010 and S5020 are available through the UIUC Airfoil Coordinates Database.

A number of European, primarily German, sites devoted to tailless RC Sailplanes:
Hartmut Seigmann's web site
Robert Schweissgut's web site
The NurfluegelTeam web site
Reinhard Seilemann's web site
The Zanonia Flyers' web site
The Swiss Nurfluegel web site
Web pages not available in English can be translated through use of the babelfish web page..

Martin Hepperle's Model Aircraft Home Page
Martin Hepperle is the designer of the MH airfoils. This site includes coordinates and polars for MH sections designed for tailless aircraft, conventional sailplanes, and pylon racing. Martin has also included a number of comprehensive articles on this web site. Of interest to tailless enthusiasts is Basic Design of Flying Wing Models.

Serge Krauss' "Tailless Bibliography"
Serge Krauss has announced a limited edition of his extensive bibliography for subsonic tailless aircraft. This bibliography is an excellent source of information, and can serve as either a standalone reference or as a database for research. Further information can be found on the tailless bibliography page .

Jim Marske home page
Descriptions of available kits (Monarch and Pioneer), the workshop schedule, and articles are all part of the new Jim Marske site. There's even a discussion group!

Steve Morris materials
Steve Morris, instrumental in the design of the S.W.I.F.T. rigid wing hang glider, flew an actively controlled unstable flying wing in 1987. This web page describes The Palo Alto Shipping Co. project in some detail, complete with illustrations and links to GIF images of the viewgraphs used inthe NASA presentation. The page also has a photo of Steve's variable sweep oblique wing demonstrator and links to a couple of other photos of the aircraft.

The Nurflugel Pages
A site focused on full size tailless designs. Separate pages devoted to Horten (includes a couple of theoretical papers translated from the original German), Northrop and Lippisch. This is a growing site, well worth a visit if you are interested in tailless aircraft history and development.

Panknin Twist Formula
A mathematical method of determing wing twist (washout) for swept wing tailless planforms. This link includes an explanation of the formula, QuickBASIC programs for both Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers, and an Excel spreadsheet template written by Joa Harrison. And Glyn Fonteneau has added a winglet design function to Joa's template. The applications contain functions to determine CG location and other essential planform data, in addition to required geometric wing twist.

Twist distributions for swept wings (OTW articles 161-165)
Ever wonder why designers of tailless aircraft might use specific twist distributions? We did, and then set about writing a series of articles to explain what we discovered. The entire five part series has appeared in RC Soaring Digest and is now available in the form of separate PDF documents. (Each document is under 150K in size.) Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5.

TWITT, The Wing Is The Thing
TWITT is a non-profit organization whose membership seeks to promote the research and development of flying wings and other tailless aircraft by providing a forum for the exchange of ideas and experiences on an international basis.

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